An Example Of What Makes Leaders Great

I love the game of basketball, as a fan, a player, and as a coach. I love being able to use the lessons that sports, more specifically basketball, has taught and apply them to other areas of life. Right now we’re able to witness some of the greatest coaches in action, and one of them is Gregg Popovich of the San Antonio Spurs.

For those of you that follow the National Basketball Association (NBA), Coach Popovich is a household name. He is a great strategist as a coach, building a consistent, championship contending team year after year. But he’s also been responsible for creating the culture for the Spurs organization, and the culture plays an important role in the building of his championship teams.

The Spurs and Gregg Popovich are great examples of leadership and team building is so many ways, but for right now I’d like to highlight this one example of how he dealt with his star player asking to be traded.

I sort of liken this situation to a disgruntled or unhappy employee looking for a new job. And when they’re unhappy, half of the time it’s because of the boss or manager, not necessarily the job or company.

In my experience, when an employee isn’t happy, there aren’t many managers that are willing to have multiple conversations with that employee and then step back and think about how they (as a manager) can change so that they can get the most out of that employee. But that’s exactly what Coach Popovich did.

Coach sat down with his player numerous times, had an open and honest conversation with him and came to the conclusion that the reason why the player wasn’t happy was because of bad coaching. Imagine that. A legendary coach, well respected throughout the league and beyond, admitting that bad coaching is what led to the players unhappiness and decline in productivity. When is the last time you’ve seen that happen in any other profession? Probably never. Or if it did happen, it wasn’t public and it certainly wasn’t made known to the employee it affected.

If you want to be a great leader and your team be willing to follow you and your direction, invest in your team, and remove your ego.

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